Sizing Guide

Sizing Guide

This guide is a brief introduction to how body jewellery and jewellery is sized and definitions of some of the most commonly used terms. Many people wear incorrectly sized Body Jewellery and compromise their own comfort and the longevity of the piercing.

We hope that after reading this section on sizing Body Jewellery you will be able to choose the correct size for your needs. We have included some guideline sizes for the most common type of piercings. We also have guides explaining the Types of Body Jewellery and the Materials used.
 

How Body Jewellery Is Measured

 

Body-Jewellery-sizessmall.jpg

 The diagram above shows the main types of body jewellery and where each measurement is taken from. 

 

Body Jewellery Sizing Definitions

 

Gauge: This is the thickness of the jewellery. The most common gauges are 1.2mm also known as micro gauge, and 1.6mm also known as standard gauge. Some jewellery is available in larger gauges such as 2.4mm, 3.2mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm and 10mm. Jewellery for Stretched Ear Lobes can be much larger than this, generally up to 38mm. It is important to match the jewellery to the correct gauge of piercing as if the jewellery is thicker (unless intentionally trying to stretch the piercing) it could cause discomfort and damage if forced in, or won't fit at all. If the gauge of the jewellery is smaller than the piercing then the piercing will usually shrink to fit around the jewellery and then become this gauge. However this can cause problems as the balls for smaller gauges are usually also smaller and they can retreat into the piercing and in extreme cases the skin could begin to grow over/around them. The best way to find the right size for you is often to measure a piece of jewellery you already have that is comfortable in your piercing.


Length: The part of the jewellery that sits in your piercing for example the straight section of the bar through a Nipple Piercing. This is how Bars and Studs are measured. This is one of the most important features of the jewellery as if a bar or stud is too tight it can cause swelling and this can lead to infection or rejection of the piercing. Some piercings such as the Tongue are pierced with a longer bar to allow for swelling and then this is changed to a shorter bar once the piercing is healed. If a piercing becomes irritated by a knock or wearing the wrong jewellery it must be cleaned regularly (see our aftercare reccomendations) and in some cases a longer bar may be neccessary to allow the piercing to settle. Wearing a bar or stud that is too long can also cause problems as it may rub or catch and this will irritate the piercing. Piercings can also shrink slightly over time, for example a navel piercing may need a shorter bar after 6-12 months. In each piercing section we have (where possible) given recommendations of the most common lengths. However this is just a rule of thumb and the best way is often to measure the body jewellery you already have that is comfortable in your piercing.

Diameter (aka internal diameter): When measuringBall Closure Rings (BCR's), Horseshoes (Circular Bars) or Segment Rings the diameter is the dimension (distance) across the centre of the inner circle of the ring. Similar to length if the ring has too small an internal diameter it will put pressure on the piercing and cause swelling and irritation. This can cause infection and rejection of the piercing and so choosing the right size ring is very important. In each piercing section we have (where possible) given recommendations of the most common diameters for rings. However this is just a rule of thumb and the best way is often to measure a ring you already have that is comfortable in your piercing.

For all body jewellery the convention unless otherwise stated is that the gauge is written first, followed by the length/diameter. For example a typical Labret would be measured as follows: 1.2mm (gauge) x 8mm (length).

 

 

Body Jewellery Size Conversion

 

Gauge Conversion

 

UK Gauge

US Gauge

 

UK Length/Diameter

US Length/Diameter

1.2mm

16g

6mm

1/4”

1.6mm

14g

8mm

5/16”

2mm

12g

10mm

3/8”

2.5mm

10g

11mm

7/16”

3.2mm

8g

12mm

1/2”

4mm

6g

14mm

9/16”

5mm

4g

16mm

5/8”

6.5mm

2g

19mm

3/4”

8mm

0g

22mm

7/8”

9.2mm

00g

25mm

1”

12mm

1/2”

32mm

1 1/4”

16mm

5/8”

35mm

1 3/8"

19mm

3/4”

38mm

1 1/2”

25mm

1”

42mm

1 5/8”

 

Jewellery Sizing & Information:

 

Bracelets and Cuffs


The standard size for a woman's bracelet is 19cm (approx 7.5"), the standard size for a mans is 21cm (approx 8.5"). UK bracelet sizes are usually given in inches and usually vary from 7-8.5". If you are unsure what size to buy an elasticated or adjustable bracelet may be a suitable choice.

 

Necklace/chain:

These are also usually measured in inches. Chains usually vary from 16-22". A standard size chain for a woman would be 16-18" and for a man 18-22". Often the best way to find a comfortable length is to measure a chain you wear often. Leather thong is often supplied instead of a chain this can be knotted at any length and then trimmed and is usually around 30" long.

 

Finger and Thumb Ring Sizing Chart

 

UK sizes are given as a letter from A-Z, some rings also go up to Z+3 which is three sizes larger than Z. The average women's size for the ring finger is M, the average for a man's ring finger is U.

There are a few things to bare in mind when measuring your finger:

  • Wider rings may sometimes feel tighter
  • The ring must be able to fit over the knuckle and sometimes the knuckle is larger than the finger
  • Warm hands may measure larger than usual, cold hands may measure smaller.
  • For your own safety never force a ring on that is too tight. If hands swell a lubricant such as an oil or cool soapy water may be used to loosen the ring and twist the ring off, never pull!
 

If you are unsure what size to buy, you can measure a ring you know fits by printing out our ring sizes template which can be downloaded by clicking the link at the bottom of the page and placing a ring on it. Please make sure the print out is to scale by checking one of the circles by measuring straight across the middle of it with a ruler, this should match the measurement given.

 

Or you can measure across the diameter of the ring with a ruler, the diameter is the widest distance from one side of the inside circle of the ring to the other. You can then use the Ring Sizing Table below to estimate the correct ring size. The table below has both UK and US ring sizes.

 

Ring Sizing Table

 

US - Canada Ring Size

Diameter in mm

British Ring Size

1/2

11.95

A

3/4

12.18

A 1/2

1

12.37

B

1 1/4

12.6

B 1/2

1 1/2

12.78

C

1 3/4

13

C 1/2

2

13.21

D

2 1/4

13.41

D 1/2

2 1/2

13.61

E

2 3/4

13.83

E 1/2

3

14.05

F

3 1/8

14.15

F 1/2

3 1/4

14.25

-

3 3/8

14.36

G

3 1/2

14.45

-

3 5/8

14.56

G 1/2

3 3/4

14.65

H

4

14.86

H 1/2

4 1/4

15.04

I

4 1/2

15.27

I 1/2

4 5/8

15.4

J

4 3/4

15.53

-

5

15.7

J 1/2

5 1/8

15.8

K

5 1/4

15.9

-

5 3/8

16

K 1/2

5 1/2

16.3

L

5 3/4

16.3

-

5 7/8

16.41

L 1/2

6

16.7

M

6 1/4

16.71

M 1/2

6 1/2

17

N

6 3/4

17.13

N 1/2

7

17.5

O

7 1/4

17.7

O 1/2

7 1/2

17.78

P

7 3/4

17.97

P 1/2

8

18.3

Q

8 1/4

18.35

Q 1/2

8 1/2

18.53

-

8 5/8

18.7

R

8 3/4

18.7

-

8 7/8

18.8

R 1/2

9

18.89

-

9 1/8

19.1

S

9 1/4

19.22

-

9 3/8

19.31

S 1/2

9 1/2

19.41

-

9 5/8

19.51

T

9 3/4

19.62

-

10

19.84

T 1/2

10 1/4

20.02

U

10 1/2

20.2

U 1/2

10 5/8

20.32

V

10 3/4

20.44

-

11

20.68

V 1/2

11 1/8

20.76

W

11 1/4

20.85

-

11 3/8

20.94

W 1/2

11 1/2

21.08

-

11 5/8

21.18

X

11 3/4

21.24

-

11 7/8

21.3

X 1/2

12

21.49

Y

12 1/4

21.69

Y 1/2

12 1/2

21.89

Z

12 3/4

22.1

Z 1/2

13

22.33

-

 

 


Ring Sizes Template